Last updated 22 Apr 2017

  Check out the new
Great Shefford Observatory blog:

Home
What's New
Location
Equipment
Software
Methods
Results
Gallery
Links
Ephemerides
Moon etc
Meetings
Contact Us
Site Map

Asteroid Gallery

2004 DF2 (small Apollo rapidly receding from Earth)

At 1am UT on 17th Feb 2004 this Apollo had come to within 2.8 lunar distances (LD) of Earth, but at that time was in the far southern sky at declination -56. LINEAR discovered it just over two days later when it had reached declination -7 and was already 9 LD away at magnitude +19 and fading fast.

Modra Observatory (118) confirmed the object 16 hours after discovery and it was imaged at Great Shefford an hour after that when it was at a distance of 13 LD (image A). A few hours later it was caught by the Tenagra II observatory which allowed the discovery announcement to be made in MPEC 2004-D17.

Just 23 hours after first imaging it at Great Shefford,  image B was obtained by which time it had receded to 18 LD and had faded over a magnitude.

This small NEO was last recorded with the 1.52-m telescope at Calar Alto in Spain, just over 24 hours after image B was taken and only three days after discovery.


 

Home Whats New Location Equipment Software Methods Results  
Gallery Links Ephemerides Moon Meetings Contact Us Site map

Copyright 2003 - 2017 Great Shefford ObservatoryFind more about Weather in Lambourn, UK